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Issue Focus

2017

November
July
  • What Does “Population Health” Mean to You?
    July 13, 2017
    Eileen Salinsky, Grantmakers In Health
    Different stakeholders use the term ‘population health’ in markedly different ways. These differences are largely driven by which group of individuals is identified as the population of interest and which interventions are being pursued to influence the health outcomes of that population.
    Subject Areas: Population Health


April
  • Supporting Older Adults and Family Caregivers
    April 13, 2017
    Colin Pekruhn, Grantmakers In Health
    Care for older adults with chronic, disabling health conditions has entered a new chapter, one with far-ranging implications for families, communities, health care, and even the economy.
    Subject Areas: Aging


2016

May
January

2015

November
October
July
April
January

2014

December
October
  • Harnessing 21st Century Technological Innovation to Promote Health
    October 20, 2014
    Colin Pekruhn, Grantmakers In Health
    Technology has progressed by leaps and bounds since the turn of the 21st century, especially for consumers. Digital health innovations are rapidly being imagined, developed, and explored worldwide. While the potential of these technological tools is exhilarating, many questions remain regarding their development, efficacy, implementation, and place in the larger scheme of health grantmaking. With the support of the Aetna Foundation, a national grantmaking leader of dHealth programs, Grantmakers In Health convened health funders and experts earlier this year to explore these issues. The following considerations and recommendations for funders are the result of their discussion.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 10-20-14 (dHealth)
    Subject Areas: Disparities, Population Health


May
March
January

2013

December
  • ACA Outreach & Enrollment: Charging the First Hurdles
    December 16, 2013
    Elizabeth Docteur, Grantmakers In Health
    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) reached a key milestone in October 2013 with the launch of new health insurance marketplaces, also known as exchanges. The recently birthed marketplaces rely on coordination across a range of actors to implement a complex and interrelated set of functions, helping people assess their coverage options, determine their eligibility for public programs and subsidies, and enroll in plans. Many health grantmakers have directed resources to support outreach and enrollment initiatives, including efforts to inform and educate the public about new coverage opportunities.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 12-16-13
    Subject Areas: Health Reform


October
September
August
July
May

2012

December
  • Innovations in Care for Chronically Ill Patients
    December 17, 2012
    Elizabeth Docteur, Grantmakers In Health
    Caring for patients with one or more long-term health conditions is the bread and butter of our health care system; yet innovations in care for the chronically ill do not always receive the attention they deserve. In this Issue Focus, promising paths to care improvement, challenges, and areas for future exploration are discussed.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 12-17-12
    Subject Areas: Health Reform


November
  • Using Media to Fight Obesity
    November 19, 2012
    Colin Pekruhn, Grantmakers In Health
    Efforts to market foods of minimal nutritional value are believed to have significantly exacerbated the obesity epidemic. This Issue Focus describes research regarding anti-obesity media messaging and provides examples of campaigns that are providing reliable, healthful information to counteract such marketing.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 11-19-12


October
September
  • The Supreme Court Decision on the Affordable Care Act: Forging Ahead
    September 17, 2012
    Anna Spencer, Grantmakers In Health
    On June 28, 2012, the Supreme Court of the United States delivered its decision on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. Following the decision, GIH held several webinars analyzing the implications of the ruling. This Issue Focus summarizes highlights from the calls and provides guidance for funders as they forge ahead with health reform implementation.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 9-17-12
    Subject Areas: Health Reform


August
June
May
  • Medical Homes 101
    May 21, 2012
    Anna Spencer, Grantmakers In Health
    First championed by the American Academy of Pediatrics more than 40 years ago, the medical home is a team-based health care delivery model led by a physician that provides comprehensive, continuous, and coordinated primary and preventive medical care to patients.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 5-21-12
    Subject Areas: Health Reform


April
  • Elder Abuse: Opportunities to Make a Difference
    April 16, 2012
    Ann McMillan, Grantmakers In Health
    In the past several decades, remarkable strides have been made in addressing the devastating issue of interpersonal violence—both child abuse and neglect, as well as intimate partner violence. Sadly, however, the issue of elder abuse lags behind these advances.

    PDF Format Issue Focus: 4-16-12
    Subject Areas: Aging


March
  • Intervention Points to Promote Equity: A Funder Strategy
    March 19, 2012
    Cara Chervin Pearsall, Grantmakers In Health
    Over the last decade, the field of health philanthropy has trail blazed efforts seeking to eliminate health disparities and promote health equity. However, while health foundations have raised public awareness of inequities and have funded interventions designed to reduce disparities, health and health care inequities persist. Funders are positioned to create and implement intervention strategies targeting a range of factors that influence health. Opportunities abound for intervention at all levels.

    PDF Format Issue Focus: 3-19-2012
    Subject Areas: Disparities


February
January

2011

August
  • Shedding Light on Maternal Mortality
    August 15, 2011
    This Issue Focus discusses maternal mortality in the United States, its rising rate in recent years, and key disparities in the rate based on race/ethnicity and class. It will also offer strategies and examples for funders to improve and promote the health of women and children before, during, and after pregnancy and childbirth.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 8-15-11
    Subject Areas: Children and Families


July
June
May
  • Connecting Kids to Coverage
    May 23, 2011
    State Medicaid programs and CHIP play a crucial role in providing coverage for low- and moderate-income children. Together, they provide access to preventive and primary care services to over one-third of all children and nearly 60 percent of low-income children.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 5-23-11 — 148KB

    Subject Areas: Access, Children and Families


April
March
February

2010

November
  • Home Visiting: Giving Parents and Children an Early Boost
    November 12, 2010
    Thousands of children are born each year to parents who struggle to adequately care for them or who lack traditional support networks. As a result, many of these children are at risk for abuse, neglect, or other negative outcomes. Home visiting programs provide an opportunity to offer new and expectant parents skills and resources to become more confident and effective, thereby increasing the odds of better outcomes for themselves and their children.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 11-15-2010 — 134KB

    Subject Areas: Children and Families


July
  • Improving Diversity in the Health Professions
    July 19, 2010
    Why do many disadvantaged groups in the United States, including people of color and low-income populations, still lack reliable access to highquality, affordable health care? Why are these groups also among the most affected by persistent and ever-widening disparities in health and health care?

    PDF Format Issue Focus 7-19-2010 — 148KB



  • Comparative Effectiveness Research: Informing Decisions and Improving Quality
    July 19, 2010
    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is the study of methods to “prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor a clinical condition or to improve the delivery of care” (IOM 2009). Its purpose is to assist consumers, clinicians, purchasers, and policymakers in making informed decisions that will improve health care at both the individual and population levels (IOM 2009). Most CER is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and its agencies, including the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality and the National Institutes for Health. While CER is an established field, there is controversy related to the potential misuse of information developed from the research.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 7-19-2010 — 187KB



May
April
  • Rethinking Substance Use Disorders
    April 16, 2010
    Almost 1 in 10 individuals over age 12 has a problem with alcohol or drugs, making substance use disorders one of the most damaging and expensive health problems facing the United States today. Yet many of the specific issues surrounding substance use remain under the radar because of their controversial nature and the highly marginalized and vulnerable populations they often affect.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 4-19-10 — 194KB

    Subject Areas: Behavioral Health


March
February
January

2009

November
October
September
August
July
  • The Cost of Chronic Disease
    July 28, 2009
    Health care costs are a major concern in the current political debate around health care reform. In 2007 the United States spent $2.24 trillion (15.2 percent of gross domestic product) on health care. Studies have shown that 75 percent of the rise in health care spending is due to the rise in prevalence of treated chronic disease.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 7-27-09 — 159KB

    Subject Areas: Access, Population Health


April
  • Behavioral Health and Public Policy
    April 9, 2009
    Behavioral health advocates ended a decade-long push for equity within private health insurance plans that cover mental health and addiction services with the passing of a new law that requires group health insurers to offer coverage for mental illness and substance use disorders on the same terms as physical illnesses.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 4-13-09 — 222KB

    Subject Areas: Behavioral Health


March
January
  • Establishing Public-Private Partnerships for Maternal and Child Health
    January 26, 2009
    Established in 1935 under Title V of the Social Security Act, the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Services Block Grant is one of the largest federal block grant programs and a critical source of flexible funding for public health. Commonly referred to as Title V, the MCH block grant is used to support core MCH public health functions in states, assess needs, and identify and address gaps in services.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 1-26-09 — 229KB

    Subject Areas: Children and Families


2008

November
  • Pediatric Medical Homes: The What and Why of It All
    November 17, 2008
    The “medical home” encompasses the places, people, and processes involved in providing comprehensive primary care services. Medical homes replace episodic patient care with a holistic approach fostering ongoing physician-patient relationships, systematic care coordination, and addressing the “whole person.” They also must deliver physician-directed patient care that is accessible, family-centered, comprehensive, continuous, coordinated, compassionate, and culturally effective.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 11-17-08 — 175KB

    Subject Areas: Children and Families


October
  • Social Policy Is Health Policy
    October 20, 2008
    Decades of research and practical experience in the United States and other countries have shown that a number of economic and social factors – education, income, occupation, wealth, housing, neighborhood environment, race and ethnicity – have a powerful influence on health. This link between social position and health status is predictable, persistent, problematic, and – we hope – preventable.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 10-20-08 — 196KB



September
August
  • Infant Mortality: Racial and Regional Disparities
    August 18, 2008
    Infant mortality is an important measure of maternal and child health status, as well as a broader indicator of a society’s health and well-being. In the United States infant mortality rates have held stubbornly at about 7 percent for the last 10 years. This statistic, however, masks significant racial and regional disparities.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 8-18-08 — 358KB

    Subject Areas: Children and Families


July
February
  • Serving Our Veterans: Filling the Gaps in Military Mental Health
    February 11, 2008
    Stories of devastation on the evening news depict families struggling to cope with the health and mental health problems of their loved ones who have served in the military. For too many, help is not coming quickly enough. Nearly one-third of returning service members had signs of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), conflicts in relationships, and other mental health problems six months after leaving Iraq.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 2-11-08 — 244KB

    Subject Areas: Behavioral Health


2007

November
  • Early Childhood Development: The Building Blocks of Health and Well-being
    November 16, 2007
    From birth to age five, a child’s brain develops at a rapid pace. As the brain’s foundation is laid, the presence or absence of critical developmental building blocks can profoundly influence a child’s cognitive, emotional, and social potential. Brain and body development are inextricably intertwined; any assessment of a child’s health must consider that a strong foundation in early childhood can foster achievement and success throughout the lifespan.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 8-13-2007 — 201KB

    Subject Areas: Children and Families


  • Promoting Children's Mental Health
    November 16, 2007
    The problem has been well documented: approximately one in five children and adolescents experiences a mental health disorder in any given year, and 1 in 10 of all youth experiences a mental illness that severely disrupts his or her daily functioning. Yet more than two-thirds who need mental health services do not receive them. While untreated mental illness can set an individual on a devastating path, early intervention or prevention can correct the course.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 11-19-2007 — 141KB



October
  • Back to School: Improving Health Literacy to Improve Health
    October 1, 2007
    The start of a new school year represents an opportune time to consider how literacy skills can influence both the quality of the health care services people receive and the health outcomes they experience. Health literacy is defined as the ability to "obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions" (Institute of Medicine 2004). This broad, functional definition requires that an individual have basic literacy skills- the ability to listen, speak, read, write, and do simple math- as well as the capacity to apply these literacy skills within the often complex context of the health care system.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 9-17-2007 — 398KB



July
  • Adolescence to Adulthood: Crossing the Threshold
    July 25, 2007
    The period between adolescence and adulthood is a time of great transition. As youth accepts the responsibilities of adulthood, they must take important choices about leaving home, continuing their education, finding a job, or starting a family. Over the past several decades, with more youth entering college and delaying marriage, the transition has become even more complex. Economic, social, and cultural factors, such as the high cost of secondary educations and fractured connections to the community, have compounded the confusion of this period.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 11-6-2006 — 298KB



  • Reducing Gun Violence: Is There a Role for Health Philanthropy?
    July 10, 2007
    Every year, approximately 30,000 Americans lose their lives to gun violence. Efforts to reduce this tragic toll raise important questions: How can gun violence be prevented? Would restrictions on gun access make a difference? Should certain types of firearms be banned? Foundations can play a role in finding answers to these and other questions. They also have opportunities to develop, test, and replicate violence prevention strategies.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 6-04-2007 — 449KB

    Subject Areas: Population Health


May

2006

December
August
  • Behind the Smile: How Funders Can Improve Oral Health
    August 22, 2006
    The consequences of neglecting oral health are significant. Oral disease can interfere with the ability to speak, chew, and swallow. In some cases, painful mouth conditions can result in overuse of emergency rooms and lost productivity, and contribute to low self-esteem. Oral disease, in children alone, is responsible for almost 52 million lost school hours each year. Bacterial infection resulting from untreated oral disease and respiratory systems. Seeing a dentist twice a year is not in itself, sufficient. Good oral health also requires avoiding tobacco products and maintaining good nutrition.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 8-14-2006 — 288KB

    Subject Areas: Oral Health


June
  • On the Front Lines of Public Health
    June 22, 2006
    Foundations are well positioned to collaborate with federal, state, and local health departments to create change within the public health system. They can also support and guide partnerships that embrace a variety of community stakeholders and draw on the strengths of each. This Issue Focus looks at strategies and examples for establishing such partnerships.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 5-1-2006 — 184KB

    Subject Areas: Population Health


  • Supporting Local Efforts to Improve Health Care Access
    June 7, 2006
    The number of Americans without access to health care has continued to climb due to rising medical costs,ongoing declines in employer-sponsored coverage,and recent cuts in public programs. With no national solution in sight, many cities and counties across the country havedesigned local initiatives to provide coverage and care for their uninsured residents. This Issue Focus looks at approaches grantmakers are taking to address these issues.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 6-5-2006 — 230KB

    Subject Areas: Access


April
  • Implementing the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit
    April 4, 2006
    On January 1, 2006, Medicare prescription drug coverage became available to the program's 43 million beneficiaries. To receive the coverage, however, beneficiaries must actively opt in to Medicare Part D by selecting a prescription drug plan (PDP). Seven and a half million dual eligibles, Medicare beneficiaries receiving drug coverage through Medicaid, were assigned to Medicare PDPs on January 1st.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 4-3-2006 — 145KB

    Subject Areas: Access, Aging


March
  • Confronting Chronic Homelessness: Health Funders Consider New Solutions
    March 17, 2006
    On any given day, at least 800,000 people are homeless in the United States, including about 200,000 homeless families. It is virtually impossible for most to find rental property within their means. Also, as many as 70 percent of homeless individuals struggle with serious health problems, mental and physical disabilities, or substance abuse problems. This Issue Focus addresses funders' responses to the issues surrounding chronic homelessness.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 3-6-2006 — 240KB



  • Preparedness or Panic: Resources for Grantmakers
    March 6, 2006
    Basic public health infrastructure is essential for effective preparation for and response to emergency events.  This resource guide is designed to help grantmakers working at the local, state, and national levels better understand how they can contribute to strengthening the public health system, as well as become more proactive in their efforts to prepare for and respond to emergencies.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 2-20-2006 — 184KB

    Subject Areas: Population Health


February
  • Innovations in the Prevention and Treatment of Diabetes
    February 17, 2006
    One of the most deadly and disabling consequences of America's obesity epidemic is the precipitous increase of individuals suffering from diabetes. According to estimates by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), approximately 4,110 people are diagnosed with diabetes each day, with 1.5 million new cases diagnosed in 2005. The ADA predicts that one in three Americans born in 2000 will develop diabetes during their lifetime. These stunning projections, coupled with the serious complications and high health care costs associated with the disease, have spurred action to improve the prevention and treatment of diabetes. Some grantmakers are at the forefront of efforts to meet the needs of people at risk or already diagnosed with diabetes, and to lead transformations in how the U.S. health system prevents and treats this disease.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 2-6-2006 — 170KB



  • Foundations and the Media
    February 17, 2006
    Local and national media outlets can help grantmakers inform and educate the public about important health issues and promote the work of their grantees. For many foundations, however, working with the media is uncharted territory. Although foundations may understand how health journalists can help inform public opinion and behavior, they might be concerned that the media may be seeking sensationalist stories or that poorly researched stories could distort or oversimplify complex health issues. Despite such concerns, even relatively small foundations have begun to harness the potential positive power of the media by establishing programs to educate journalists and partnering with organizations that have established media connections and the expertise to get the right message out and create the right impact. While some funders use communications and public relations firms for this purpose, there are other resources to help promote responsible and appropriate coverage of health issues in the media.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 1-10-2006 — 144KB



  • Partnering to Improve Public Health
    February 15, 2006
    The public health system is the nation's first line of defense against many threats, both naturally occurring and manmade. It ensures the public's health and safety by identifying and tracking disease, protecting food and water supplies, educating the public on a variety of health issues, and responding to disasters. Public health, however, remains largely invisible to most Americans – until something goes wrong.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 11-21-2005 — 171KB

    Subject Areas: Population Health


2005

September
  • For the Benefit of All: Ensuring Immigrant Health and Well-Being
    September 12, 2005
    Immigrants and their families contribute to the diversity and economy of the nation, contributing to vibrant, productive, and healthy communities. Yet, immigrants face several barriers to health and well-being. Some result from being disproportionately low income and uninsured; others are unique, such as cultural and linguistic barriers; limited eligibility for public benefits; and bearing the brunt of unwelcoming public views, attitudes, and policies. Addressing these barriers benefits immigrant populations and strengthens entire communities, and the nation as a whole.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 8-15-2005 — 192KB



  • Considering Quality: Engaging Consumers to Make Better Health Decisions
    September 12, 2005
    Given information and opportunity, consumers can play an important role in improving health care quality and the responsiveness of the health system to their needs. Whether they are making decisions about choosing a health plan, a particular provider, a course of treatment, or how to incorporate healthy choices into their daily lives, empowered and engaged consumers can be a potent force for change.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 6-20-2005 — 192KB



May
  • Medicaid: Vital to Women's Health
    May 9, 2005
    Although Medicaid is not usually perceived as a women's health program, it covers critically important medical care for 12 million American women.  Grantmakers with a focus on women's health are paying close attention to proposals to restructure the Medicaid program, which could have major implications for low-income women's access to health care services.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 5-2-2005 — 152KB

    Subject Areas: Access


March
  • Improving the Health and Well-being of Children in Foster Care
    March 16, 2005
    As a group, children in foster care may be the unhealthiest children in America. They are substantially more likely to have health problems than children in other groups at risk for poor health status, including children in low-income families, homeless children, and children in families receiving public assistance. Once in the foster care system, many children fail to receive needed health, mental health, and other services and often suffer additional trauma as a result of frequent moves from one foster care placement to another. Much remains to be done to ensure that the health needs of children in foster care are met.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 3-7-2005 — 188KB

    Subject Areas: Children and Families


February
  • Getting Prescription Drugs to Those Who Need Them Most
    February 18, 2005
    There are major changes taking place in the way elderly and disabled people pay for prescription drugs.  These changes are being ushered in by the new Medicare law, which, if it lives up to its promise, will be incredibly helpful to some of the most vulnerable members of our society.  What are the details of the new law?  How many people will it affect?  How will low-income people be assisted?  What are the implementation challenges?  How are they being addressed by the federal government?  What can grantmakers do to help?

    PDF Format Issue Focus 2-21-2005 — 140KB

    Subject Areas: Access, Aging


January

2004

November
  • New Choices and Hard Decisions: Helping Seniors Navigate Medicare
    November 19, 2004
    Educating seniors on the changes to the Medicare program will be a challenge for both the public and private sectors.  Reaching the nation's 41 million Medicare beneficiaries -- 35 million of whom are over the age of 65 -- will require a mix of customized, one-on-one assistance and broad education campaigns.  This Issue Focus proposes that providing information and referral services for seniors and their families is an area ripe for foundation work, and outlines a number of opportunities for grantmakers.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 5-3-2004 — 205KB

    Subject Areas: Access, Aging


October
  • Addressing Maternal Depression
    October 19, 2004
    Maternal depression affects not only a woman herself, but also her family, friends, and coworkers. Of particular concern is maternal depression's link to problems in children's health, mental health, and development. This Issue Focus highlights ways that health grantmakers can address maternal depression and its consequences, including educating women and health care providers, promoting screening and treatment, integrating mental health services into programs serving pregnant and parenting women, and supporting research.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 10-18-2004 — 247KB



August
June
April
March
January
  • Grantmakers Respond to Medication Errors
    January 28, 2004
    Medication errors are among the most common preventable medical errors. This Issue Focus article discusses a variety of strategies to reduce medication errors, from relabeling similarly named medications to purchasing and implementing new technologies in institutional settings, and how foundations can facilitate the adoption of these and other strategies.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 12-15-2003 — 129KB

    Subject Areas: Quality


2003

November
October
  • Terrorism and Meeting the Needs of the Nation's Children
    October 15, 2003
    The events of 9/11 and the ongoing threat of terrorism have had a profound effect on all Americans. Moreover, the systems responsible for responding in the event of a terrorist act, such as health and public safety, are less prepared to address the needs of children than other populations. This Issue Focus looks at strategies funders can use to incorporate the needs of children into emergency preparedness planning by involving schools, hospital pediatric departments, and other youth-serving organizations.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 10-20-2003 — 133KB



September
June
April
March
  • Children's Mental Health: Prevention, Early Intervention, and Treatment
    March 10, 2003
    Each year, 1 in 10 American children experiences a mental illness severe enough to cause some impairment in the child's ability to function in school, family, and community settings.  Yet only a small proportion of those in need receive treatment. Grantmakers interested in improving children's mental health have a wide array of options available to them. This Issue Focus illustrates some of the approaches available, including investments in prevention and early intervention programs, helping schools identify at-risk children, improving mental health services for underserved populations, building community service capacity, and promoting system change.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 3-10-2003 — 82KB



2002

September
  • Y2K and Health Care
    September 3, 2002

    Written just prior to the year 2000, this Issue Focus discusses the potential impact of the Y2K problem and its effect on the delivery of health care, especially to vulnerable populations.  It also explores philanthropy's role at the local, state, and national levels to help mitigate these predicted problems.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 9-27-1999 — 200KB



  • Weighing in on Obesity
    September 3, 2002
    The country is facing double threats: a dramatic increase in rates of overweight and obesity among children and adults, and an accompanying increase in diabetes and other conditions that threaten the lives and health of the nation's population. This Issue Focus explores ways that grantmakers can play a role in identifying and promoting effective prevention and intervention strategies, including tackling the root causes of the problem.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 1-14-2002 — 777KB



July
  • Expanding Access for the Uninsured: Building a Community Response
    July 25, 2002
    Foundations have made access to care a priority - convening community leadership, funding communitywide planning processes, facilitating health system change, expanding insurance coverage, building the capacity of safety net providers, and filling gaps in delivery of services.  This Issue Focus features promising models and key lessons learned from across the country. 

    PDF Format Issue Focus 7-29-2002 — 91KB

    Subject Areas: Access


May
  • Putting Patient Safety into Practice: Strategies for Health Care's Front Lines
    May 10, 2002

    Reducing medical errors and heightening patient safety are critical to health care quality improvement.  This Issue Focus looks at specific error and patient safety issues and how grantmakers, researchers, hospitals, and health systems are working together to address them.  Each of the tactics presented has led to improved quality of care and demonstrated how grantmakers can use funding strategies and research results to implement patient safety work within their own communities.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 5-13-2002 — 64KB

    Subject Areas: Quality


March
February

2001

November
June
April
March
  • Advancing Quality through Improved Patient Safety
    March 16, 2001

    Despite the most sophisticated medical care in the world, each year more Americans die at the hands of our health care system than from some of life's deadliest diseases. This Issue Focus presents information on what medical errors are, how they occur, and what strategies grantmakers can adopt to prevent them.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 3-12-2001 — 60KB



  • Intergenerational Programs: Drawing on the Resources of Youth and Elderly
    March 6, 2001
    Intergenerational programs recruit older adults to work with young people, train children to serve older adults, bring youth and elders together to serve others, or serve youth and the elderly in the same facilities.  This Issue Focus highlights foundation funding in this area, ranging from the support of intergenerational mentoring programs to the development of initiatives to gather data on the effects of intergenerational programs on health.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 6-21-1999 — 882KB

    Subject Areas: Aging


  • Childhood Immunization: Protecting Individuals and Communities
    March 6, 2001

    Childhood immunizations are one of the greatest public health achievements in modern times. Questions, however, have been raised about the value and safety of specific vaccines – underscoring the need for balanced, accurate information about vaccines and the diseases they prevent.  This Issue Focus examines government and foundation-supported child immunization programs such as public education efforts and vaccine registries.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 3-27-2000 — 59KB

    Subject Areas: Children and Families


  • Early Childhood Development: Opportunities for Improving the Field
    March 6, 2001

    Much is known about the process of child development, and how many factors – health, parental involvement, economic status, and the environment, among others – can affect future outcomes. Based on a 2000 Issue Dialogue, this Issue Focus explores the importance of good health for young children, suggests common elements of successful child development programs, and discusses strategies and opportunities for grantmakers interested in this field.

     

    PDF Format Issue Focus 11-20-2000 — 73KB

    Subject Areas: Children and Families


  • Long-Term Care Quality: Facing the Challenges of an Aging Population
    March 6, 2001
    As our population ages, and the need for long-term care services grows, issues surrounding the quality of care, as well as the quality of life, will become increasingly important. Based on a recent GIH Issue Dialogue, this Issue Focus explores ways in which grantmakers can partner with policymakers, health care professionals, advocacy groups, and patients and their families to improve the quality of long-term care.

    PDF Format Issue Focus 3-6-2001 — 71KB

    Subject Areas: Aging, Quality


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