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Issue Focus by Eileen Salinsky Sep 2019

Building an Evidence-Base for Gun Violence Prevention: Research and Data Needs

Gun violence prevention research is woefully underfunded, receiving significantly less research funding and scientific attention compared with other leading causes of death. Using a methodology that calculated expected levels of research investment based on mortality rates, one study estimated that between 2004 and 2015 gun violence received just 1.6 percent of the federal research support projected and had 4.5 percent of the volume of publications anticipated.

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Issue Focus by Colin Pekruhn Sep 2019

Policies for Those Who Care: Investing in Systems That Support Family Caregivers

Across the country, more than 45 million family members are providing care for older adults with chronic, disabling health conditions. There are a multitude of reasons why health grantmakers should be concerned about this, ranging from caregivers’ critical role in managing the needs of complex care patient populations to the manifold short- and long-term impacts caregiving has on the health and wellness of caregivers themselves.

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Supporting Children, Youth, and Families Affected by “Zero Tolerance” Immigration Policies

Recent efforts to introduce new federal and state immigration legislation and to modify existing guidelines have resulted in an atmosphere of uncertainty and fear for many in immigrant, migrant, and refugee communities. This atmosphere was recently compounded by a directive to separate migrant children and parents detained after crossing the United States-Mexico border, including those seeking asylum.

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GIH Events

Investing in Latino Leadership for Health Equity and Justice

Rising inequality, shifting demographics, and current immigration policies have intensified efforts to promote health equity and social justice for Latinos. The second-fastest growing racial group in the United States, Latinos now make up 18 percent of the population (Flores 2017).

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Public-Private Collaboration to Catalyze Adoption of Evidence-Based Practices

Working together, public and private funders can create lasting health improvements in the communities they serve. Foundations and state health agencies often have the same goals; they may even fund the same organizations, programs, and individuals.

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Violence Is Preventable

Mass shootings command public attention, but for too many Americans violence is a threat that must be confronted every day. Violent crime, although low relative to historical rates, has risen in recent years and disproportionally affects poor, racially segregated, urban neighborhoods (U.S. Department of Justice 2017; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development 2016).

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Staying the Course in Turbulent Waters

Managing change is hard, but managing uncertainty can be even harder. This sentiment captures the challenges health funders have faced while navigating the roiling health policy debates of the 115th Congress.

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GIH Events

What Does “Population Health” Mean to You?

Population health is commonly defined as “the health outcomes of a group of individuals, including the distribution of such outcomes within the group” (Kindig and Stoddart 2003). This general definition is widely accepted and has been formally adopted by the National Academies’ Roundtable on Population Health Improvement.

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GIH Events

Domestic Violence: A Public Health Priority

Domestic violence represents a significant public health problem that has received limited attention from the field of health philanthropy. Many health foundations fund domestic violence programs, but relatively few funders have identified domestic violence as a strategic priority.

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Supporting Older Adults and Family Caregivers

Care for older adults with chronic, disabling health conditions has entered a new chapter, one with far-ranging implications for families, communities, health care, and even the economy. The current system does not adequately support the needs of those routinely providing extensive help with daily activities, delivering complex medically-related services, and coordinating health care and long-term services and supports.

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