Staying the Course in Turbulent Waters

Managing change is hard, but managing uncertainty can be even harder. This sentiment captures the challenges health funders have faced while navigating the roiling health policy debates of the 115th Congress.

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GIH Events

What Does “Population Health” Mean to You?

Population health is commonly defined as “the health outcomes of a group of individuals, including the distribution of such outcomes within the group” (Kindig and Stoddart 2003). This general definition is widely accepted and has been formally adopted by the National Academies’ Roundtable on Population Health Improvement.

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GIH Events

Domestic Violence: A Public Health Priority

Domestic violence represents a significant public health problem that has received limited attention from the field of health philanthropy. Many health foundations fund domestic violence programs, but relatively few funders have identified domestic violence as a strategic priority.

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Supporting Older Adults and Family Caregivers

Care for older adults with chronic, disabling health conditions has entered a new chapter, one with far-ranging implications for families, communities, health care, and even the economy. The current system does not adequately support the needs of those routinely providing extensive help with daily activities, delivering complex medically-related services, and coordinating health care and long-term services and supports.

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GIH Events

Bridging Community Development, Health, and Metrics

The community development sector plays a vital role in improving neighborhood conditions, lifting people and places out of poverty, and transforming the health of low-income communities. Increasingly, community development financial institutions (CDFIs) are partnering with health foundations to invest in health-promoting efforts such as affordable housing, health clinics, grocery stores, and child care centers.

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GIH Events

Policy Unsweetened: Tackling Sugar-Sweetened Beverages

Grantmakers’ interest in supporting healthy eating policies has grown over the past two decades and been rewarded with considerable progress. Nonetheless, the next phase of policy work brings new challenges, opportunities, and questions. To explore these issues, Grantmakers In Health (GIH) convened Tackling Difficult-to-Crack Healthy Eating Policies, a strategic conversation for funders, practitioners, and experts in Sacramento, California. 

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GIH Events

Healthy Eating and Active Living: Checking in on Philanthropy’s Investments

The Surgeon General’s Call to Action in 2001 sparked widespread public concern about the rising prevalence of obesity and overweight in the United States. Since then, many health funders have supported obesity prevention, healthy eating/active living, and healthy living.

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GIH Events

Supportive Housing: Strengthening Communities, Improving Health

Supportive housing has emerged as an innovative and comprehensive intervention that addresses the health inequities associated with housing instability, affordability, and homelessness. In this model, housing is combined with wraparound services such as primary and behavioral health care, case management, financial assistance, and legal counseling.

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GIH Events

Philanthropy and Community Development: Partners In Health

Community development financial institutions (CDFIs) are funding projects across the nation to support health care centers and clinics, grocery stores with healthy food options, and healthy housing. Read this Issue Focus on how CDFIs are a valuable potential partner for health philanthropy.

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GIH Events

The Cuban Prescription: Human-Centered Care

Earlier this year, members of Grantmakers In Health’s board and senior staff visited Havana, Cuba, with MEDICC, an organization licensed by the U.S.Department of the Treasury to conduct people-to-people trips to Cuba. The primary objectives of the trip were to see the Cuban approach to health in action, and to consider whether there were takeaway lessons for the U.S. health system.

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