Q&A: Bringing an Australian Perspective to American Health Philanthropy

Traveling thousands of miles from Melbourne to Minneapolis, Lauren Monaghan of The Ian Potter Foundation attended the 2023 GIH Annual Conference on Health Philanthropy to learn more about the American public health philanthropy sector at the country’s largest gathering of health funders.

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Lessons from an Equity Toolkit Workshop: Facilitator Perspective on Participatory Engagement

The Blue Shield of California Foundation is a long-time multisector collaborative funder with a health equity focus. Increasingly, we find that multisector collaboratives are a powerful vehicle to change systems toward racial equity. We heard from our partners and grantees a strong need for tools and resources that provide several outcomes: to establish equity at the collaborative level, to outline an arc of learning to help place a collaborative on an equity spectrum, and to provide tools to help collaboratives move deeper into equity. To support this work, the Equity in Collaboration Toolkit was developed in partnership with Cristobal Consulting. Its goal is to help multisector collaboratives see where they are taking concrete actions to center equity—and where they are not—through an embedded equity assessment.an embedded equity assessment.

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Strengthening a National Field of Practice for Climate, Health, and Equity: Learning What it Takes

When The Kresge Foundation’s Climate Change, Health and Equity (CCHE) initiative launched in 2018, community power mobilization was integral because too often the people closest to viable climate resilience solutions were excluded from decisionmaking. Since then, the leadership of CCHE’s community-based, health practitioner, and health institution partners has underscored the significance of community power to transform climate policy and public health practice.

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Notes from the Journey: Going Beyond Words to Advancing Health Equity

In the weeks since the 2023 Grantmakers In Health conference in Minneapolis, where we gathered as a community of grantmakers seeking to advance health equity, I have been reminded often of the inspiring and encouraging conversations we had by an envelope of Post-It Notes sitting on my desk. These notes make me smile. They make me feel connected. And their messages motivate me to continue the journey from health to health equity for the long haul.

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Terrance Keenan Institute Alumni Reflect on How COVID-19 Changed Grantmaking

Foundations play a vital role in the nonprofit sector, funding everything from safety net services to social innovation. Like many businesses, philanthropic organizations altered their ways of doing business in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The health sector, including hospitals and other health care settings along with public health organizations, were deeply affected by the magnitude of illness and the polarization of the pandemic response. To understand exactly how the business of health grantmaking shifted during COVID-19, Jennifer Chubinski and Allen Smart conducted in-depth interviews with health foundation leaders from around the country to learn what changed in their grantmaking strategies and practices.

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The Kids Are Okay: Lessons Learned from a Youth-Led Participatory Grantmaking Program

The Natrona Collective Health Trust (NCHT) was created in October 2020 after the sale of our community’s standalone nonprofit hospital to a regional hospital system. As Wyoming’s first health conversion foundation, NCHT uses trust-based philanthropy and systems change advocacy to advance the mental well-being of our community’s young people. During an extensive strategic planning process, we found that at both our community and state levels, there is insufficient infrastructure to address mental and behavioral health needs, which perpetuates health disparities and high incidences of childhood trauma.

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Thirty-Three Years Later: Oral Health Care Still Not Accessible for Individuals with Disabilities

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), enacted on July 26, 1990, stands as one of the most significant civil rights laws in U.S. history. Designed to eliminate discrimination and ensure equal opportunities for Americans with disabilities, the ADA has had a profound impact on advancing health equity in various domains, including oral health. The ADA has been a transformative force in advancing health equity for Americans with disabilities by championing their rights to accessible health care services. Under Title II of the ADA, state and local governments, including public healthcare institutions, are mandated to offer equal access and reasonable accommodations to individuals with disabilities. This ensures that medical facilities, including dental offices, are equipped to cater to diverse patient needs, fostering an environment where disabled individuals can receive oral health services with dignity and equality

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Episcopal Health Foundation’s Journey in Advancing Medicaid Non-Medical Drivers of Health in Texas

Access to affordable medical care is vitally important, but it is only 20 percent of what contributes to a person’s overall health. The remaining 80 percent is determined by social and economic status, health behaviors, community safety, physical environment, and much more. From grantmaking to working with community partners and congregations to providing research, EHF supports solutions that address underlying factors impacting health.

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Want to See Lasting Systemic Change and Transformation to Build Health Equity? Invest in Power Building

Despite a commitment to transformation, equity, and rebalancing the scales of justice, philanthropy often operates in ways that undermine its very purpose. Historically, the philanthropic field has taken a siloed and narrow approach to change, offering investments in short-term funding cycles and attempting to create change from the top down.

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Health Philanthropy Impacting the Health and Well-Being of Family Caregivers

More than 53 million Americans—21 percent of the US population—are caregivers for loved ones who are older adults or adults living with chronic, disabling, or serious health conditions. Increasingly, the US health and long-term care systems rely on family caregivers. In 2017, family caregivers in the US provided a staggering 80 percent of long-term care, valued at $470 billion, and in 2021, 38 million family caregivers spent 36 billion hours caring for older adults, amounting to an estimated $600 billion in unpaid caregiving.

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